prostheticknowledge:

Kepler’s Dream

Project by Michael Burk is an analogue projection device to intimately view 3D printed objects  - video embedded below:

Kepler’s Dream is an aesthetical investigation, exploring analog projection technology in the combination with computationally created content that is given a physical shape through 3D printing.

Inspired by obsolete projection technologies like the overhead projector, and especially the episcope, an installation was designed that generates unique imagery and a fascinating experience.
Mixing digital aesthetics - parametric and generative shapes - with the qualities of analog projection creates an otherworldly look that seems to be neither digital nor analog.
Interacting with the installation creates a deeply immersive effect, as the instant reaction of the projection and the “infinite frame rate“ let this fantastical world come to life.

More Here

#yess  

Anonymous asked: are you missing someone?

oh ano to HAHAHA who is this

06 07

dnd

I plan on sleeping this life away. 

sickpage:

Kenneth Ipcress
Colours of Night, 2013

(via baveuile)

#colors  

fuckyeahviralpics:

Fully transparent rain forest frog

(via the-absolute-best-posts)

#ahhh :3  

macklemack:

50 shades of dark circles under my eyes

(via goodlifequote)

destroyed-and-abandoned:

About 80 years ago the owner of this house just walked away, it has since remained untouched. Bodie, CA

Source: Runner_one (reddit)

(via nluh)

t-etta:

"The Afghan Girl"

Sharbat Gula posing with her portrait on the cover of 1985’s National Geographic.The image itself was named “the most recognized photograph” in the history of the magazine.

"Sharbat Gula (born ca. 1972) is an Afghan woman who was the subject of a famous photograph by journalist Steve McCurry. Gula was living as a refugee in Pakistan during the time of the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan when she was photographed. The image brought her recognition when it was featured on the cover of the June 1985 issue of National Geographic Magazine at a time when she was approximately 12 years old. In January 2002, a National Geographic team traveled to Afghanistan to locate the subject of the now-famous photograph. The team finally located Sharbat Gula, then around the age of 30, in a remote region of Afghanistan." (Article)

(via nluh)

(via the-absolute-best-posts)

kateoplis:

This week in Life 

humansofnewyork:

"I have this saying: ‘Things have an awfully funny way of working out.’ Actually— I changed it recently. Now I say: ‘Things have an awfully funny way of working out. If you make them work out.’"
"What caused you to change your saying?"
"Things weren’t working out."

mind-b-l-o-w-i-n-g:

I DON’T KNOW WHAT THIS IS BUT WHY WASN’T I INVITED

(via ruinedchildhood)

sickpage:

Rachel Baran
Dependency, 2014

#ahhh  

luxio:

what if instead of gender we all had pokemon types

(via joshpeck)

jedavu:

Mount Nyiragongo And Its Bubbling Hot Lava Lake

Few volcanoes are as spectacular as Mount Nyiragongo. Known for its active lava lake and (relatively) frequent eruptions, this incredible volcano has the potential for widespread disaster. Unfortunately, political unrest prevents the scientific community from studying the dangerous volcano in depth. But as seen in these breathtaking images, scientists and photographers have still been able to capture the bubbling, fiery lava that churns within the mountain’s lava lake.